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- added 02 Apr, 2014
by MaFt - no comments
A selective view from a British perspective of the progressive development of Hammer Throwing throughout the last two millennia. Part 1

Abstract

Hammerphiles of all walks will no doubt enjoy Mike Morley’s latest Part 1 of his 3-part trilogy edition herein as he takes a personal and yet comprehensive look at the historical evolution of the hammer throw which spans over the past two millennium. He begins the journey by including articles and illustrations of the earliest know hammer like throwing implements and events as far back as 3000 years BC, through the time of the Irish origins of the Olympics, and all the way up to the present time. Classical references to contemporary modern cinema Gods and hero’s such as Thor and his mystical powers using his Mjollnir bring to light how the folklore about the hammer throw becomes almost like scripture that comes to life leading up to modern times modern times.

Then, as Mike treks through the hammers proliferation during the middle ages and shares more annotated illustrations and photo’s, one begins to get a real sense of how throwing events such as the sledge and hammer became so popular, combining both the challenge of physical strength and the essence of the required technical acumen which today render hammer throw competitions as the most challenging of all the throwing events in the modern era. Morley goes on to share a significant amount of research on the hammer legacy attributed by the efforts of Scottish and Irish throwers during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, many of whom represented the first generation of immigrant hammer throwers in America. It is during this era that he describes many historical accounts of these throwers such as the great Donald Dinnie, describing he and others as to what they were like as men, as sportsman, including their remarkable feats of strength.

For his conclusion to this Part 1 edition of the trilogy, Morley includes some historical origins and recordings of the first known competitive rules and rulebooks associated with hammer implements and their associated competitions. All in all readers will find Morley’s manuscript to be a fascinating and enjoyable walk and reflection through the life and times of some of the greatest founding hammer throwers of all time.

 

Download: A selective view from a British perspective of the progressive development of Hammer Throwing throughout the last two millennia. Part 1